Davison DD- 618 - History

Davison DD- 618 - History


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Davison

Gregory Caldwell Davison, born 12 August 1871 in Jefferson City, Mo., graduated from the Naval Academy 27 May 1892. He served in many ships, specializing in torpedo boat operations. An excellent scientist as well as an efficient naval officer, Lieutenant Commander Davison was responsible for many inventions in ordnance and general naval science. Retiring 31 December 1907 he became Vice President of the Electric Boat Company, Groton, Conn., continuing his interest in and support of the Navy until his death 7 May 1935.

( DD-618: dp. 1,630; 1. 348'4"; b. 36'1"; dr. 17'5";
s. 35 k.; cpl. 270; a. 4 6", 1 21" tt.; cl. Benson)

Davison (DD-618) was launched 19 July 1942 by Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Kearny, N.J.; sponsored by Mrs. G. C. Davison; and commissioned 11 September 1942, Lieutenant Commander W. Winn In command.

Davison cleared New York 13 November 1942, screening transports carrying reinforcement troops and supplies to Safi, French Morocco between 8 and 18 December. She returned to New York 10 January 1943. After two more voyages to North Africa as convoy escort between 8 February and 28 April, she sailed from Norfolk 6 June for Oran, arriving 22 June. On the 4th of July she sortied with TF 85 for the invasion of Sicily on 10 July, acting as convoy escort and patrol vessel off the transport area until returning to Oran 22 July. Six days later she was en route to New York, arriving 8 August, and sailing 21 August for another convoy voyage to Bizerte, then sailed again on 7 October to screen a convoy by way of Belfast, Northern Ireland to Palermo, Sicily. Like so many other Mediterranean convoys at this time, Davison's group came under heavy air attack from German planes based in Southern France, on 6 November while off Algiers. Firing to protect her charges, she splashed at least one enemy plane, and aided survivors of torpedoed Beatty (DD-640), and two merchantmen. She returned by way of Belfast to New York 24 January 1944, making two escort voyages to Northern Ireland and Scotland between 11 February and 21 April escorting convoys from Norfolk and New York to Naples, Marseilles, and Oran until 7 June 1945.

On 8 June 1945 Davison reported to Charleston, S.C. for conversion to a high.speed minesweeper. She was reclassified DMS-37, 23 June, and trained in minesweeping exercises in Chesapeake Bay until 27 August when she sailed from Norfolk for the western Pacific arriving at Okinawa 15 October. She swept mines in the Yellow Sea, remaining in the Far East on occupation duty until 11 March 1946 when she cleared Yokosuka for San Francisco, arriving the last day of the month.

Davison served in the western Pacific again from 12 September 1946 to 29 March 1947, calling at Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Guam, Chinese and Korean ports, and Kwajalein. On 10 March 1948 she sailed west again with a team from the Naval Research Laboratory embarked for balloon tests in the Marshall Islands until returning to San Diego 4 June. Davison was placed out of commission in reserve at San Diego 24 June 1949. On 15 July 1955 she was reclassified DD-618.

Davison received three battle stars for World War II service.


USS Davison (DD 618)

Converted to High Speed Minesweeper DMS-37 on 23 June 1945.
Decommissioned 24 June 1949.
Reverted back to DD-618 on 15 July 1955.
Stricken 15 January 1972.
Sold 27 August 1973 and broken up for scrap.

Commands listed for USS Davison (DD 618)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Lt.Cdr. Walter Coulter Winn, USN11 Sep 194210 Aug 1943
2T/Cdr. James Dahlman Collett, USN10 Aug 194311 Mar 1944
3T/Cdr. Ernest Leo Edward Ritson, USN11 Mar 194420 Jun 1945
4Lt.Cdr. Onofrio Frederick Salvia, USN20 Jun 194513 Jun 1946

You can help improve our commands section
Click here to Submit events/comments/updates for this vessel.
Please use this if you spot mistakes or want to improve this ships page.

Media links


DD-618 Davidson

Davison (DD-618) was laid down 26 February 1942, launched 19 July 1942 by Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Kearny, N.J. sponsored by Mrs. G. C. Davison and commissioned 11 September 1942, Lieutenant Commander W. C. Winn in command.

Davison cleared New York 13 November 1942, screening transports carrying reinforcement troops and supplies to Safi, French Morocco between 8 and 18 December. She returned to New York 10 January 1943. After two more voyages to North Africa as convoy escort between 8 February and 28 April, she sailed from Norfolk 6 June for Oran, arriving 22 June. On the 4th of July she sortied with TF 85 for the invasion of Sicily on 10 July, acting as convoy escort and patrol vessel off the transport area until returning to Oran 22 July. Six days later she was en route to New York, arriving 8 August, and sailing 21 August for another convoy voyage to Bizerte, then sailed again on 7 October to screen a convoy by way of Belfast, Northern Ireland, to Palermo, Sicily. Like so many other Mediterranean convoys at this time, Davison's group came under heavy air attack from German planes based in Southern France, on 6 November while off Algiers. Firing to protect her charges, she splashed at least one enemy plane, and aided survivors of torpedoed Beatty (DD-640), and two merchantmen. She returned by way of Belfast to New York 24 January 1944, making two escort voyages to Northern Ireland and Scotland between 11 February and 21 April escorting convoys from Norfolk and New York to Naples, Marseilles, and Oran until 7 June 1945.

On 8 June 1945 Davison reported to Charleston, S.C., for conversion to a high-speed minesweeper. She was reclassified DMS-37, 23 June, and trained in mine sweeping exercises in Chesapeake Bay until 27 August when she sailed from Norfolk for the western Pacific arriving at Okinawa 15 October. She swept mines in the Yellow Sea, remaining in the Far East on occupation duty until 11 March 1946 when she cleared Yokosuka for San Francisco, arriving the last day of the month.

Davison served in the western Pacific again from 12 September 1946 to 29 March 1947, calling at Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Guam, Chinese and Korean ports and Kwajalein. On 10 March 1948 she sailed west again with a team from the Naval Research Laboratory embarked for balloon tests in the Marshall Islands until returning to San Diego 4 June. Davison was placed out of commission in reserve at San Diego 24 June 1949. On 15 July 1955 she was reclassified DD-618.


DAVISON DD 618

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Gleaves Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid February 26 1942 - Launched July 19 1942

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Service history [ edit ]

She cleared New York on 13 November 1942, screening transports carrying reinforcement troops and supplies to Safi, French Morocco between 8 December and 18 December. She returned to New York on 10 January 1943. After two more voyages to North Africa as a convoy escort between 8 February and 28 April, she sailed from Norfolk on 6 June for Oran, arriving on 22 June.

On 4 July she sortied with Task Force 85 (TF㻕) for the invasion of Sicily on 10 July, acting as convoy escort and patrol vessel off the transport area until returning to Oran on 22 July. Six days later, she was en route to New York, arriving on 8 August, and sailing on 21 August for another convoy voyage to Bizerte, then sailed again on 7 October to screen a convoy by way of Belfast, Northern Ireland, to Palermo, Sicily. Davison ' s group came under heavy air attack from German planes based in southern France on 6 November, while off Algiers. Her crew shot down at least one enemy plane, and aided survivors of the torpedoed destroyer Beatty, and two merchantmen. She returned by way of Belfast to New York on 24 January 1944. She made two escort voyages to Northern Ireland and Scotland between 11 February and 21 April escorting convoys from Norfolk and New York to Naples, Marseilles, and Oran until 7 June 1945.

On 8 June 1945, Davison reported to Charleston, South Carolina, for conversion to a high-speed minesweeper. She was reclassified DMS-37, 23 June, and her crew was trained in mine-sweeping exercises in Chesapeake Bay until 27 August. She then sailed from Norfolk for the western Pacific, arriving at Okinawa on 15 October. She swept mines in the Yellow Sea, remaining in the Far East on occupation duty until 11 March 1946 when she left Yokosuka for San Francisco, arriving the last day of the month.

Davison served in the western Pacific again from 12 September 1946 to 29 March 1947, calling at Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Guam, various Chinese and Korean ports, and Kwajalein. On 10 March 1948, she sailed west again, with a team from the Naval Research Laboratory for balloon tests in the Marshall Islands, returning to San Diego on 4 June. Davison was placed out of commission in reserve at San Diego on 24 June 1949.

On 15 July 1955, she was reclassified DD-618. Stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 15 January 1972, Davison was sold on 27 August 1973 and broken up for scrap.

Davison received three battle stars for World War II service.


Close

General Description:
2002 McElroy Rolling 618 Fusion Machine.

Accessories:
-18" Heater with Stand
-Lifting Device

Recent Work/Modifications:
Seller States:

-Model Year: 2002
-Rebuilt Year: 2020

-New Engine
-New Generator
-New Control Valves
-New Hydraulic Hoses
-Re-sharpened Facer Blades
-Recoated Butt Plates

Additional Information:
Seller States: Fuses pipe sizes 6" IPS - 18" OD.

New and Used Inserts Available.
Machine is Datalogger Compatible.
Fusion Filters Available (replacement advised every 50 hours).

Contact HDD Broker for pricing on these important jobsite accessories.

Photos

Finance this equipment for as low as $807 USD per month!

Financing is easy! Just follow these simple steps:

  • Fill out the application »
  • Fax supporting paperwork to +1.250.474.6099
  • You'll be contacted with a credit decision within 24-48 hours*

Enter the approximate value of the equipment you wish to have the equipment assurance applied to in order to calculate the approximate cost of purchasing the equipment assurance.


Mục lục

Davison được chế tạo tại xưởng tàu của hãng Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company ở Kearny, New Jersey. Nó được đặt lườn vào ngày 26 tháng 2 năm 1942 được hạ thủy vào ngày 19 tháng 7 năm 1942, và được đỡ đầu bởi bà G. C. Davison, vợ góa Thiếu tá Davison. Con tàu được cho nhập biên chế cùng Hải quân Hoa Kỳ vào ngày 11 tháng 9 năm 1942 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Thiếu tá Hải quân W. C. Winn.

Davison khởi hành từ New York vào ngày 13 tháng 11 năm 1942, hộ tống một đoàn tàu vận chuyển binh lính tăng viện và tiếp liệu đi sang Safi, Maroc từ ngày 8 đến ngày 18 tháng 12. Nó quay trở về New York vào ngày 10 tháng 1 năm 1943, và sau hai chuyến đi hộ tống khác sang Bắc Phi từ ngày 8 tháng 2 đến ngày 28 tháng 4, nó khởi hành từ Norfolk vào ngày 6 tháng 6 để đi Oran, đến nơi vào ngày 22 tháng 6.

Vào ngày 4 tháng 7, Davison khởi hành cùng Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 85 để tham gia Chiến dịch Husky, cuộc đổ bộ của lực lượng Đồng Minh lên Sicily vào ngày 10 tháng 7. Nó hoạt động như tàu hộ tống vận tải và tuần tra ngoài khơi khu vực vận chuyển, cho đến khi quay trở về Oran vào ngày 22 tháng 7. Sáu ngày sau, nó lên đường quay trở về New York, về đến nơi vào ngày 8 tháng 8, để rồi lại lên đường vào ngày 21 tháng 8 cho một chuyến hộ tống vận tải đến Bizerte, tiếp nối bởi một chuyến hộ tống khác khởi hành vào ngày 7 tháng 10, đi ngang qua Belfast, Bắc Ireland để đến Palermo, Sicily. Đội của nó chịu đựng một cuộc không kích nặng nề của máy bay Không quân Đức đặt căn cứ tại miền Nam nước Pháp vào ngày 6 tháng 11 đang khi ngoài khơi Algiers hỏa lực phòng không của nó bắn rơi một máy bay đối phương, rồi sau đó cứu vớt những người sống sót từ tàu khu trục Beatty (DD-640) và hai tàu buôn bị trúng ngư lôi. Nó quay trở về New York ngang qua Belfast vào ngày 24 tháng 1 năm 1944 rồi còn thực hiện hai chuyến hộ tống khác đến Bắc Ireland và Scotland từ ngày 11 tháng 2 đến ngày 21 tháng 4, hộ tống các đoàn tàu từ Norfolk và New York sang Naples, Marseilles và Oran cho đến ngày 7 tháng 6 năm 1945.

Vào ngày 8 tháng 6 năm 1945, Davison đi đến Charleston, South Carolina để được cải biến thành một tàu quét mìn cao tốc nó được xếp lại lớp với ký hiệu lườn mới DMS-37 vào ngày 23 tháng 6, và thủy thủ đoàn được huấn luyện thực hành quét mìn tại vịnh Chesapeake cho đến ngày 27 tháng 8. Nó khởi hành từ Norfolk để đi sang khu vực Tây Thái Bình Dương, đi đến Okinawa vào ngày 15 tháng 10. Con tàu đã hoạt động rà quét mìn tại Hoàng Hải, và tiếp tục ở lại làm nhiệm vụ chiếm đóng tại Viễn Đông cho đến ngày 11 tháng 3 năm 1946, khi nó rời Yokosuka quay trở về Hoa Kỳ, về đến San Francisco vào ngày 31 tháng 3.

Davison lại phục vụ tại khu vực Tây Thái Bình Dương từ ngày 12 tháng 9 năm 1946 đến ngày 29 tháng 3 năm 1947, ghé qua Trân Châu Cảng, Eniwetok, Guam, nhiều cảng Trung Quốc và Triều Tiên cũng như Kwajalein. Vào ngày 10 tháng 3 năm 1948, nó lại lên đường đi sang phía Tây, lần này cùng một nhóm thuộc Phòng thí nghiệm Nghiên cứu Hải quân để thử nghiệm khí cầu tại khu vực quần đảo Marshall, quay trở về San Diego vào ngày 4 tháng 6.

Davison được cho xuất biên chế và đưa về lực lượng dự bị tại San Diego vào ngày 24 tháng 6 năm 1949. Vẫn đang trong thành phần dự bị, nó được xếp lớp trở lại DD-618 vào ngày 15 tháng 7 năm 1955. Tên nó được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 15 tháng 1 năm 1972, và lườn tàu bị bán để tháo dỡ vào ngày 27 tháng 8 năm 1973.

Davison được tặng thưởng ba Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


USS Davison (DD-618)

USS Davison (DD-618/DMS-37), a Gleaves-class destroyer, was named for Lieutenant Commander Gregory C. Davison (1871–1935). Commander Davison specialized in torpedo boat operations.

Davison was launched 19 July 1942 by Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Kearny, New Jersey sponsored by Mrs. G. C. Davison and commissioned 11 September 1942, with Lieutenant Commander W. C. Winn in command.

She cleared New York on 13 November 1942, screening transports carrying reinforcement troops and supplies to Safi, French Morocco between 8 December and 18 December. She returned to New York 10 January 1943. After two more voyages to North Africa as a convoy escort between 8 February and 28 April, she sailed from Norfolk on 6 June for Oran, arriving 22 June.

On 4 July she sortied with Task Force 85 (TF㻕) for the invasion of Sicily on 10 July, acting as convoy escort and patrol vessel off the transport area until returning to Oran on 22 July. Six days later, she was en route to New York, arriving 8 August, and sailing 21 August for another convoy voyage to Bizerte, then sailed again on 7 October to screen a convoy by way of Belfast, Northern Ireland, to Palermo, Sicily. Davison's group came under heavy air attack from German planes based in southern France on 6 November, while off Algiers. Her crew shot down at least one enemy plane, and aided survivors of the torpedoed Beatty (DD-640), and two merchantmen. She returned by way of Belfast to New York on 24 January 1944. She made two escort voyages to Northern Ireland and Scotland between 11 February and 21 April escorting convoys from Norfolk and New York to Naples, Marseilles, and Oran until 7 June 1945.

On 8 June 1945, Davison reported to Charleston, South Carolina, for conversion to a high-speed minesweeper. She was reclassified DMS-37, 23 June, and her crew was trained in mine-sweeping exercises in Chesapeake Bay until 27 August. She then sailed from Norfolk for the western Pacific, arriving at Okinawa on 15 October. She swept mines in the Yellow Sea, remaining in the Far East on occupation duty until 11 March 1946 when she left Yokosuka for San Francisco, arriving the last day of the month.

Davison served in the western Pacific again from 12 September 1946 to 29 March 1947, calling at Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Guam, various Chinese and Korean ports, and Kwajalein. On 10 March 1948, she sailed west again, with a team from the Naval Research Laboratory for balloon tests in the Marshall Islands, returning to San Diego on 4 June. Davison was placed out of commission in reserve at San Diego on 24 June 1949.

On 15 July 1955, she was reclassified DD-618. Stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 15 January 1972, Davison was sold on 27 August 1973 and broken up for scrap.

Davison received three battle stars for World War II service.


Service history

She cleared New York on 13 November 1942, screening transports carrying reinforcement troops and supplies to Safi, French Morocco between 8 December and 18 December. She returned to New York on 10 January 1943. After two more voyages to North Africa as a convoy escort between 8 February and 28 April, she sailed from Norfolk on 6 June for Oran, arriving on 22 June.

On 4 July she sortied with Task Force 85 (TF㻕) for the invasion of Sicily on 10 July, acting as convoy escort and patrol vessel off the transport area until returning to Oran on 22 July. Six days later, she was en route to New York, arriving on 8 August, and sailing on 21 August for another convoy voyage to Bizerte, then sailed again on 7 October to screen a convoy by way of Belfast, Northern Ireland, to Palermo, Sicily. Davison ' s group came under heavy air attack from German planes based in southern France on 6 November, while off Algiers. Her crew shot down at least one enemy plane, and aided survivors of the torpedoed destroyer Beatty, and two merchantmen. She returned by way of Belfast to New York on 24 January 1944. She made two escort voyages to Northern Ireland and Scotland between 11 February and 21 April escorting convoys from Norfolk and New York to Naples, Marseilles, and Oran until 7 June 1945.

On 8 June 1945, Davison reported to Charleston, South Carolina, for conversion to a high-speed minesweeper. She was reclassified DMS-37, 23 June, and her crew was trained in mine-sweeping exercises in Chesapeake Bay until 27 August. She then sailed from Norfolk for the western Pacific, arriving at Okinawa on 15 October. She swept mines in the Yellow Sea, remaining in the Far East on occupation duty until 11 March 1946 when she left Yokosuka for San Francisco, arriving the last day of the month.

Davison served in the western Pacific again from 12 September 1946 to 29 March 1947, calling at Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Guam, various Chinese and Korean ports, and Kwajalein. On 10 March 1948, she sailed west again, with a team from the Naval Research Laboratory for balloon tests in the Marshall Islands, returning to San Diego on 4 June. Davison was placed out of commission in reserve at San Diego on 24 June 1949.

On 15 July 1955, she was reclassified DD-618. Stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 15 January 1972, Davison was sold on 27 August 1973 and broken up for scrap.

Davison received three battle stars for World War II service.


Davison Reviews

A link has directed you to this review. Its location on this page may change next time you visit.

For more information about reviews on ConsumerAffairs.com please visit our FAQ.

Everyone that I have spoken with has been helpful. They make me feel like family as the project gets completed and ready to help people make their lives less stressful because they have one less thing to worry about and that's family safety. Mr ** and Mr ** have been very knowledgeable and passionate about helping inventors like myself. I look forward to continue working on this project. Thank you.

I was very skeptical going into this venture, believing that my idea would only be laughed at and the dream of actually having it become a reality would remain at that status--a dream. But then I met Mr. Bryan ** and from the first time I chatted with him on the phone, he changed my entire outlook and had me convinced that I have "inventor potential." I went with that idea and joined the Davison program, keeping Mr. ** as my mentor, motivator and guide. He was amazing, and I can credit him for making a believer out of me.

At first, the fee seemed out of reach, as I am retired and only collecting social security benefits as income, and I became discouraged right off the bat over the cost to get my idea developed, manufactured and marketed. But Bryan was not one to just say, "okay, too bad for you, bye!" He would not let me back out of going forward with my project because Davison has the understanding that everyone is not filthy rich and they are willing to work with the would-be inventor to make it affordable with monthly payments based on what you can afford. There are also monthly incentive bonuses to help defray the cost and reduce actual out-of-pocket expense.

I finally reached the pinnacle of my fees and now on my way to the predevelopment stage of my project. I really believe that the Davison Company is in my corner and ready to take on the challenge of getting my idea fully developed and into stores nationwide. I'm excited over the prospects and what comes next as we move forward in a partnership of friends--me, Mr. Davison, and his team of talented professionals who stand behind the Davison reputation. Thank you, Bryan **, for not letting me back out!!

Thank you, you have successfully subscribed to our newsletter! Enjoy reading our tips and recommendations.

Updated on 05/04/2021: I have started with Davison only a few months (December 2020) and so far, I do not any negatives except one caveat. They have been helpful. They do keep in touch and questions are answered and options to ask questions are given. My only problem is costs. When started, I knew that nothing was for free but what I did not realize or informed was every step moving ahead, has a cost. Based in the USA, all costs are in US currency and I am not an American. My project is going along well, so long as I pay the costs otherwise it becomes "stuck" until final payment. But as with any business, nothing is for free. If I had to start over and knew their pricing structure, I would have saved some cash first before I ventured there. If not for that caveat, it would earn its 5 stars.

Original Review: I have just completed paying on the feasibility of my project. Mr **, thru emails have kept in touch but cell phone calls don't work 98% of time, despite my giving the correct numbers. More literature on invention processes would be greatly appreciated.

I am very pleased with how Mary keeps in touch and listens to all of my stories and all of my feedback. I am so excited to be moving into preproduction. I find this product so exciting and good in nature to be able to assist in saving lives and keep people safe while we take part in all of our outdoor activities, it's really not just for swimming although that was one of its primary roles since inception.

I feel it's brilliant in its simplicity even though it's not as simple as it looks in design. I feel everybody should have one and hope to one day make it affordable enough for everybody to have one on every beach and every coast, and coupled with everybody's personal crafts such pwc, atv, utv and Motorcycles. I believe in Davison to bring this to life and so far you are doing a great job to bring this to life! I have so many more great ideas for you moving forward. I look forward to our calls and hopefully meeting in person one day. Have a great Thanksgiving.

I am utterly shocked by the humility and benevolence I have received from the Davison representative I have been assigned to. He is kind, honest, punctual, and he always brings me up when I'm feeling nonplussed. He is so wonderful that he forces my energy to match his energy, and it's always on point. He has walked me through the beginning steps to becoming an inventor, and he doesn't let me quit. I am excited to meet the new team member I will be working with in the next upcoming days!!

Whomever is reading this review, please be advised that if you have a product idea, or new invention, Davison IS THE COMPANY you want to work with. Looking forward to visiting Inventionland, meeting the founder (Wizard) who chose this incredible team of people, and is inspiring so many others in this country to spread their creativity all over the map. Whatever your doubts are about becoming an inventor, throw them out. Manifesto, seems silly, is the only way to live. Think positive, push that energy out of you, and you will likely notice that great things are among you and around you. And mostly. DONT EVER GIVE UP. And don't spend the rest of your life wondering what if. I'm not, thanks to Davison. 5 stars. And I'd give my experience 5 million stars if I could. BRAHHH-VO team. Well done, very well done.

From the very first phone call I have received in regarding my invention idea up until now and every email and phone call correspondence in between has been a pleasant experience. Jermaine ** has been especially personable and professional and made me feel comfortable with the entire process never putting me under any pressure but instead encouraging my idea and ambitions and supporting my efforts genuinely as well and has been thoroughly explanatory as far as the process of becoming a part of the Davison team.

Everything was supportive and conducted efficiently while never making me feel obligated or pressured in any way to make any decisions or or anything. I was uncomfortable with there was always a great feeling of just support and someone sincerely wanting to help and back me up in an idea that I had and didn't know how to go about getting it started. I've been nothing but grateful for all the support and encouragement from the team at Davidson and Jermaine **.


Watch the video: ΙΣΤΟΡΙΑ της ΔΡΩΤΑΣ ΑΚΡΑΣΙΟΥ, Βίντεο 7ο


Comments:

  1. Barnet

    Absolutely with you it agree. In it something is also idea good, I support.

  2. Coopersmith

    A more options?

  3. Tezilkree

    Here and so too happens:)

  4. Fawwaz

    Your message, just the beauty

  5. Reginheraht

    You allow the mistake. I can defend my position. Write to me in PM, we will discuss.



Write a message